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Category: Reviews

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Dec
21

Dr. Langeskov, The Tiger and The Terribly Cursed Emerald: A Whirlwind Heist Review // Twenty Minutes of Fame

2013's The Stanley Parable had the Internet abuzz with its British wit, ridiculous Easter eggs, and 'looping' gameplay. It became so popular that it helped pioneer the "walking simulator" genre, interactive narrative-focused adventures that rely on player exploration and visual cues often to convey an overarching message. The leading visionaries of The Stanley Parable have gone their own ways since their definitive debut. Davey Wreden went on to create The Beginner's Guide, a thought-provoking response to The Stanley Parable, and William Pugh formed the studio CrowsCrowsCrows. Dr. Langeskov, The Tiger and The Terribly Cursed Emerald: A Whirlwind Heist (or DLTTATTCEAWH for short. I'm just gonna call it A Whirlwind Heist) is Pugh's first project with his newly conceived studio. The game is twenty minutes long. Can this bite-sized game stand in its predecessor's shadow?

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Dec
17

Undertale Review // A Quirky, Charming Adventure That You Must Experience For Yourself

Nowadays, games attempt to wow people with flashy graphics, explosive setpieces, and huge open worlds. A linear experience with little to no gameplay that looks like it came out of the 1980s seems like a recipe for disaster. However, Undertale is an exhilarating, refreshing journey that surprised me with a must-play RPG bound to fill you with determination.

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Nov
24

Transformers: Devastation Review // A Stylish Yet Repetitive Transformation

In the four hours it took for me to complete the main story in Transformers: Devastation, I believed that I was watching a new episode of the '80s show or at least a new movie. I loved every second of it, but the more I played it the more I noticed the problems that ended with some unsatisfying moments.

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Nov
20

Fallout 4 Review // The Wasteland Never Changes

It's been seven years since Fallout 3 originally released in late October 2008, a huge game that many could hardly believe ran on last generation consoles. It's hard to believe it's been that long, but in that time a lot of things have changed for open world video games. Games like Grand Theft Auto V and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt have proven that you can have a large open world and still have your game look beautiful while maintaining a (relatively) steady framerate on consoles. After seven years and a ton of innovation in the industry, can Fallout 4 stand out as the best current gen open world experience?

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Nov
12

Broken Age Review – Beautifully Thinking Outside Of The Box

In this modern gaming world, it's rare to see a genre not as well represented as the others. Even if you have to dig a little, there is always something for everyone, whether your looking for horror, platformers, or even simulation games. There is one genre, however, that seems to be a dying breed, a genre that is struggling to find it's place in this day and age. That genre is the point and click style of games. While they were everywhere in the earliest years of gaming, it's becoming more and more of a surprise to see one released by an indie studio, let alone a AAA developer. Broken Age is proof that the genre can and should survive, creating a wonderful, if sometimes frustrating, experience I couldn't put down.

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Nov
10

Halo 5: Guardians Review- A New Halo to Love

If there is one thing that Halo 5: Guardians makes perfectly clear it’s that 343 Industries is not Bungie. 343 demonstrates its willingness to craft its own game, rather than ride on the coattails of Bungie. The story and gameplay both make bold choices that usually payoff. There is certainly a lot of risk in fundamentally changing a game, and while some elements fall flat, the game as a whole is great. Halo 5’s true achievement is showing that 343 is quite capable of crafting its own vision for the world of everyone’s favorite Spartan.

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Oct
05

Bloodborne Review- A Masterpiece Built on Blood, Sweat, and Tears

As the pile of games I've beaten over the years becomes more and more massive, I've become aware that a lot of video games follow many similar patterns to one another. How they present themselves, how they handle progression, but most importantly, how they act towards the player. Many games give you direction, or at least the sense of what you should be doing, trying their best to point you down the path that will lead to progress. Bloodborne is absolutely nothing like most games, throwing the player into an unknown world and letting them carve out their path, however they like. While it did sometimes push me to my absolute limit, for every soul crushing defeat there is a victory that made me pump my fist in the air and shout in triumph.

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Oct
02

Persona 4: Dancing All Night Review- Pursuing My True Groove

The Investigation Team is back in action as they dance their way to the truth. Our review.

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Sep
25

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain Review

Have you ever wanted to play a Metal Gear Solid game? I mean, have you ever wanted to play the game instead of sitting through hours of cut scenes and codec conversations?  Then this is the Metal Gear Solid game for you.

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Aug
28

Until Dawn Review- The Horror of Choices

Until Dawn is what you get when you mix horror movie tropes into a choice driven video game. On paper it works, but how does that translate into the actual product?

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